TW:DIY Guides

It’s the TW:DIY guide to doing the Edinburgh Fringe

Published on Monday 16 July 2018

This year we are talking to lots of people who work and perform at the Edinburgh Fringe about the ins and outs of presenting shows at the world’s biggest cultural festival. We’ll then pick the top tips out of those interviews and collect them here to create a guide to doing at show at the Edinburgh Fringe. Look out for more top tips appearing throughout the summer.


 

THE RATIONALE OF PERFORMING AT THE FRINGE

“Producers and artists have all sorts of different reasons for bringing work to Edinburgh, and I think the important thing for everyone is to understand the best and worst-case scenarios and to be at peace with the possibility that either could transpire. If you do lose all the money, would it still be worth doing? If the answer is no, then you probably shouldn’t come in the first place. I think that there are probably too many cases of people bringing shows because they feel they should. There was one year recently where it only made sense for me to bring up a couple of shows and there was another Fringe when I was involved with producing 22 different productions. And I’ve done pretty much everything in between!”
producer James Seabright

“Bringing a show to Edinburgh is such a commitment of energy, time and money that I do think you want to be sure that you – yourself – really believe in any new play before you bring it here. That way, if you don’t get the review coverage you wanted or the audience numbers, you can’t really have any regrets. It’s just bad luck. And there’s a lot that’s dependent on luck up here!”
playwright Roxy Dunn


 

DOING A FULL FRINGE RUN V A SHORT RUN

“I often hear various Fringe commentators declaring that everyone should do a full three week run or not bother at all. That’s a short sighted view. A huge percentage of performers have financial or availability constraints that make full three week runs impossible. We’ve had as much award success with short run shows as with those doing the full three weeks, if that is a way that success can be measured. Beyond that, the Fringe is really about the experience. It’s a platform to learn and evolve. So anytime here is definitely valuable as part of that learning process”.
Charles Pamment – Venue Director at theSpaceUK


 

THE RATIONALE OF PERFORMING ON THE FREE FRINGE

“If you’re not filling rooms of over about 125 every night, you likely lose money on the – what shall we call it? – the ‘paid Fringe’. My first solo hour on the Expensive Fringe sold out every night and we put on an extra show in a larger room, yet I still owed money at the end of it. That’s hard to swallow, both financially and morale-wise. If you only made £1 every show [on the Free Fringe], that would still be far, far more profitable overall than doing a 60-seater at the Pleasance! It all depends on scale, though. Once you are in profit at a big paid-for venue, it can really add up. So if you’re selling out the big purple cow for the whole festival, you’re raking it in on a scale the Free Fringe probably couldn’t compete with. But the names who can do that are few”.
comedian Nick Doody


 

DO YOUR RESEARCH FIRST

“I think it is impossible to understand how the Fringe works unless you’ve experienced it first-hand. I’d advise complete newcomers to just spend their first Fringe observing rather than producing. You’ll learn so much that way and be much better placed to give your first production its best possible chance. And the other key thing to remember is to ask lots of questions. If you don’t know the answer to something, then find someone who does and ask them. The Fringe is a hugely supportive community and, whilst it is also competitive, it is also cooperative in spirit”
producer James Seabright


 

CHOOSING A VENUE

“On a logistical level, it’s crucial that a venue can really offer the services and facilities a show needs. Given the very competitive nature of the Festival, I’d say that that includes strong branding, a focused press office and a known awards pedigree, as well as a reputation for presenting work similar to that which the company has planned. And finally, I’d say that – whatever anyone tells you – location is crucial. That might sound obvious, but I’m always amazed by how many producers don’t ask about position and footfall. Oh, and do compare prices too. They seem to range vastly these days”.
Charles Pamment – Venue Director at theSpaceUK

“Choose a venue where you will feel supported. Being at one of the big venues may be a good deal for some acts, but for many it will mean huge fees and being drowned out by the vast number of shows”.
Katrina Woolley – Head Of Programming at the Bedlam Theatre

“Look at a variety of things when you are identifying where your show might sit both logistically and artistically. For example: is there a focus on new writing or a specific artform? Is it a curated or non-curated programme? Look at previous years to see how your show might fit. Think about the audience capacity of the spaces you are considering and if you can realistically get a good number of folk in. I also like to look at how a venue’s programme is marketed – is it an appealing brochure or website that you can find your way around and is it appealing to read or look at”.
producer Kate Taylor

“Scrutinise the deal properly, making sure you know what is included and what isn’t, to avoid unexpected surprises later on. We operate a straight hire fee model and our deal is all-inclusive, which means your venue costs are covered in advance and you can focus all of your attention on the important thing – your show”.
the team at Paradise Green

“The saying goes ‘location location location’ and it’s hard to argue with that, but from my point of view performers should always consider whether the venue is a good fit for the show. With so many venues across Edinburgh there is plenty of choice. Don’t try to squeeze a rock musical into a small studio theatre, but at the same time a new writing piece running for only a week is unlikely to need a 160-seat amphitheatre”.
Giles Moss – Production Manager at theSpaceUK


 

APPROACHING A VENUE

“Give us as much information as you possibly can in order that were can make a proper decision”.
Anthony Alderson – Director at Pleasance

“When it comes to pitching the show, think about the work you want to bring and find the elements that are unique, sellable and align with other aspects of a venue’s programme; highlight your previous artistic track record; if you have had good press in the past incorporate that into you pitch. If you know who your audience is or is likely to be, let venues know this – it will be reassuring for them to know you have thought about your offer from all aspects”.
producer Kate Taylor

“If I had one tip for performers making applications, it would be to always consider how you make that first approach. Never underestimate the power of that good feeling you get from a great meeting or phone call, or a well-written and genuine email”.
JD Henshaw – Venue Director at Sweet Venues

“I pitched the show as clearly as possible with a video teaser and was really clear about what we wanted to get out of the Festival. It’s a good idea to show that you’ve put some thought into the practicalities of coming to Edinburgh as well as demonstrating the passion that’s behind your incredible show!”
Russell Dean – Artistic Director at Strangeface Theatre


 

WHAT IF YOU DECIDE TO PERFORM IN A NON-TRADITIONAL SPACE?

“Key things here are sight-lines and sound bleeding from other parts of the venue. Working a theatre piece in a building that is not designed for theatre can be challenging if you have a rock-band in the room next door and all your guests are straining to hear what is happening. Also, hotels and restaurants are great at marketing hotels and restaurants, but not necessarily theatre shows. So that is a massive conversation you need to have early on”.
Alison Pollard-Mansergh – Artistic Director at ITI


 

FINDING A PRODUCER OR PROMOTER TO WORK WITH

“Try and do it off your own back the first year. Try the Free Fringe and do everything yourself, preferably with a mixed bill or a double bill. And once you discover how hard it really is, you’ll better understand what it is the promotor does! Go see an act you like. Then walk around town and see if you’re happy with the number of posters and leaflets that act has out there. Do they have a ‘presence’ on the Fringe. If so, find out who is looking after them and watch how they work, for all the different shows they represent. Talk to acts and find out from them who has impressed. So, basically, do your research and then reach out”.
comedy promoter Brett Vincent


 

PREPARING YOUR SHOW

“Set realistic goals. Do you want to make money? Break even? Build up reviews? Experiment with new material?”
Katrina Woolley – Head Of Programming at the Bedlam Theatre

“Know why you want to be at Edinburgh Fringe with this specific show. Are you bringing the work to Edinburgh to really hone it for the future? Or are you already set to take the next step and so what your show needs is for a bit of industry to view it alongside new audiences? Or is this simply a bucket-list moment and performing at the Fringe is entirely for you? All are good reasons. But if you say ‘I want everything’, you are going to struggle. Once you know what it is you want to achieve, you’ll be well on your way to having not just a great show, but a great Fringe”.
JD Henshaw – Venue Director at Sweet Venues

“Really know your reason for coming – ie is it about raising press profile, connecting with promoters, building audiences, and so on. Obviously it will probably be a combination of these things, but if you have a main outcome for your time on the Fringe clearly in mind, your work around the show will be more focused”.
producer Kate Taylor

“Prepare as much as you can before you get here, because when you arrive, there’s always loads more to do. Ask for help. There are many many people here who are more than willing to give advice”.
Alison Pollard-Mansergh – Artistic Director at ITI

“First and foremost, above all else, make sure your show is the very best it can be. It might sound obvious to say that, but it’s so easy to get carried away making sure your marketing is great, or arranging your accommodation and travel, or whatever, that the show itself can suffer. Those other things are important and will help you have a brilliant time at the Festival, but if the show isn’t great then all those things will be in vain”.
James Mackenzie – Venue Director at ZOO Venues

“My best advice would be to carefully read the emails from the venue’s team. Everything you need to know to stage your show successfully is detailed in the emails, publications and website links our team sends to every company. There is a lot to take in, that’s for sure, so we send a number of emails during the run up to direct your attention towards the things you should be considering next”.
Giles Moss – Production Manager at theSpaceUK

“I regularly go back to the Fringe guidelines for performers just to check I have covered everything! Also, the majority of us are creating work on a small scale with small teams, so don’t have the luxury of marketing or press teams. You have to be prepared to take on things you might not normally do and may not feel skilled at”.
producer Kate Taylor


 

DIRECTING & DESIGNING YOUR SHOW

“I think you lose a bit of control when presenting at the Fringe, but that is balanced by the opportunity to present your work to one of the most dynamic audience bases in the world. It’s also hands down the best fun!”
Emma Jordan – Artistic Director at Prime Cut

“Especially when you work on theatre shows, it’s important to be realistic about what is possible in terms of production values at the Fringe. One of my early shows had a ridiculously cumbersome set, to the extent that I spent all of the contingency budget on gifts for the poor venue crew who had to carry it upstairs and back down again every day for a month. Audiences and critics alike understand the practicalities of the Fringe model, and if you have a good show on your hands you can always build the scale of its design as you move forward to the next stage of its development”.
producer James Seabright

“Think about your set. Venues will have shows running back to back, meaning you’ll normally only have a really small window to get your set in and out each day before you perform, so less is definitely more. Ask lots of questions and give us as much information as you can. We know your show will develop a lot before the Fringe, but keeping us updated and letting us know about anything new – even small changes to equipment, lighting or props – will save a lot of last minute panic when you arrive”.
the team at Paradise Green

“Do the most with the least, otherwise it could be the other way round! Always talk to the venue about any concerns rather than hoping it’ll be fine when you turn up. And make sure you have a good relationship before you arrive”.
Russell Dean – Artistic Director at Strangeface Theatre

“Be ambitious, but please be realistic. It doesn’t matter how big your budget is or how elaborate your ideas are, there is a limit to what can be achieved with a three hour tech before opening and ten minute changeovers before every performance. Your audiences are willing to use their imaginations, so they’ll believe that an actor is in a cafe if they’re holding a cup and saucer – they don’t always need to see the rest”.
stage manager Gemma Scott

“At the Fringe, you have to compromise a lot. For starters, you’re venue isn’t necessarily a conventional theatre. This year we performed in a former church, last year it was a tent. Plus, of course, it is very likely that the lighting set up in your performance space is not only for your show, it will have to serve many others as well. So, yes, compromise is the key word here!”
lighting designer Attila Lenzsér

“Be honest about your show and what it will require of you and the venue. Don’t assume things and ask questions! We have a great team who will guide you through the experience”.
Ed Bartlam and Charlie Wood – Directors at Underbelly

“We see a lot of companies coming with grand ideas that are unfortunately too complicated or impractical for a Fringe environment. The clever ideas generally involve using things in multiple ways, for example a table that’s also a boat that also becomes a box to hold your props and costumes while stored”.
Giles Moss – Production Manager at theSpaceUK


 

RUNNING YOUR SHOW

“Be prepared for an extremely short time in the venue before your show opens. So plan everything you can in advance and in as much detail as possible. Know precisely what you want. Once you are in the venue, always start with the key parts of the production, because you can always enhance things later on. In fact, let me tell you a secret. At the Fringe, everyone fine-tunes the lighting during the first week of show. So if you are doing that, don’t worry, you are not the only one!”
lighting designer Attila Lenzsér

“Changeovers between shows can be as little as five minutes, so they can be quite intense. Within a few days you’ll have a system that runs smoothly, but it can be pretty chaotic to start with! I find that, like with almost every aspect of stage management, lists can make the whole thing run much smoother. Sometimes I think 90% of this job is writing lists!”
stage manager Gemma Scott

“Practically speaking, know the geography of the city and where you are staying in relation to your performance space – late night taxis are very expensive! The traffic can be awful and roads that were previously open might now be closed when you need to do a load in, plus parking is a nightmare and Edinburgh traffic wardens are FIERCE! Access into a venue can be tricky too and can involve many steps; understand what a ten-to-fifteen minute get in and get out really means in relation to your cast and set and so on”.
producer Kate Taylor

“Most importantly, and this is absolutely essential – make friends with your venue tech. They are working harder than you and they’re dealing with grumpy people far more often than they should. So buy them cake, smile, say thank you, and they’ll be much more willing to help you when something goes wrong – and it will!”
stage manager Gemma Scott


 

SELLING YOUR SHOW

“Bring the best work you can – so that press and word of mouth reviews really work for you. Spend time on the image for your show – don’t underestimate the power of a strong visual. Embrace promotional opportunities that might result in spreading the word. Get to know your audience so you can target your flyering”.
producer Kate Taylor

“At the Fringe, with so many shows to choose from, an eye-catching title is essential. Whilst a strong image and marketing design is also important, that can’t counteract a weak title. If in doubt, ask around amongst fellow performers, producers and audience members before you commit to a title”.
producer James Seabright

“Ensure you a have a great image, with this you can draw your audience in. Make sure you use this image across everything. Marketing at the Fringe is all about layers, seeing that image in the programme, on flyers and posters will fix your show in people’s minds. Take time to test your ideas out on friends and colleagues, things that may appear obvious to you working on a show may actually confuse an audience”.
James Mackenzie – Venue Director at ZOO Venues

“Be specific about who your audience is and aim to target those people as much as possible, rather than just throwing flyers at every person that walks past you. Make sure that you and your cast know and understand your show inside out and practice snappy soundbites that sell it”
Darren Neale and Tara Stapleton – Venue Directors at Greenside

“When you’re planning how to talk to people about the show, figure out two things. First, the one line hook. Tell me something that makes me want to know more about the show. Though remember, that does actually have to be about the show itself, and not just some non-sequitur that may make someone look for a moment, but then they’ll wander off less impressed than they should have been. Second, have the next two sentences ready so you can tell someone who liked the hook more about the show. Being able to have a quick and friendly conversation with potential audience members or industry people which really nails the core ides of the show will always win out against long rambling attempts to explain every single idea the production may seek to explore”.
JD Henshaw – Venue Director at Sweet Venues

“Speak to people who have done it. Speak to our programming team and marketing team who are there to help you. Get the lay of the land, make a plan and stick to it. Make sure your promo visual is distinctive and strong and test it off friends and strangers. And get your elevator pitch honed”.
Ed Bartlam and Charlie Wood – Directors at Underbelly

“Start getting the word out early. Social media and ticket offers are great ways to get some buzz around your show in the first few days of the Fringe. Flyering is by far the most popular marketing tool, but with over 3000 shows to compete with you need to find that unique selling point – we recommend a 20 second elevator pitch, special offers or a short performance to make you stand out”.
the team at Paradise Green

“These days you have to find your own audience, and YouTube, Instagram, Facebook or some other form of social media will probably play a key role in that. We have definitely seen that work and grow in the last few years. Today, you can be a reviewers’ favourite but it still might not put bums on seats”.
comedy promoter Brett Vincent

“You can’t underestimate the power of flyering at the Fringe. Flyer hard, flyer regularly and flyer well! Beyond that, try working with other companies at the venue, especially if you’re a one-person production. Help each other flyer, support each other on social media and view each other’s shows. That can really help with both morale and marketing”.
Jen McGowan – Press Officer at theSpaceUK


 

PICKING WHICH MEDIA TO TARGET

“Whilst of course there are certain top targets – national coverage, for example, will always carry a certain amount of weight – the days when Edinburgh performers, even high profile ones, would dismiss coverage on a blog as not useful enough are pretty much over. So whilst we target different press for different shows depending on their specialisms and interests, outside of that we value all press coverage. Recognised media brands help lend credibility if they endorse a show, and we have to make sure we get that kind of press into the mix. But equally, you shouldn’t underestimate a well written and intelligent rave review in a blog you’ve never heard of. It can still make a real difference – especially for flyers, posters and online sharing”.
Madelaine Bennett – publicist at Premier


 

APPROACHING MEDIA

“Write a good press release. Lay it up nicely on one page. Add a picture. Make sure all the listing info is correct and is clear. Fringe Central has a press list you can download – it won’t have as many contacts as a PR will, but it’s very useful if you don’t have PR.Also go online and see which blogs cover the Fringe each year, they’re not all listed on the media list and they often have their contact details on their site. Email them as early as you can. If you’ve not started your press outreach yet, it’s not too late but it is definitely time to start. Don’t bombard them – 30 emails to the same journalist begging for attention won’t win you many friends – but equally don’t be afraid to follow up your initial outreach. Press can sometimes get literally 1000 emails in a day at peak Fringe time so there’s no harm in a couple of follow up notes to maximise your chances of being noticed”.
Madelaine Bennett – publicist at Premier

“Take every opportunity via your venue and the Fringe Society to meet the media. PR is really all about networking and these are great opportunities to network. When you talk to critics, remember they are human! They are just as passionate about arts and culture as you are, so engage them in conversation and find out what they are interested in, rather than immediately jumping down their throats with your pitch. Though, that said, have a great pitch for when you’re specifically asked about your show”.
Jen McGowan – Press Officer at theSpaceUK


 

GETTING ON THE THREEWEEKS RADAR

“Firstly, fill out our registration form. We do thumb through the programmes looking for shows if we have time, but it’s not generally the way we do it, so actively putting your show on our list will vastly increase your chances of being noticed my me and my staff. Secondly, send a press release to TWedinburgh@unlimitedmedia.co.uk and Make It Short. Think lots of informative bullet points that we can read in a hurry. Don’t think we don’t want to read your well crafted paragraphs! We do, but we just don’t have time because we receive many thousands of them. Thirdly, attend the Fringe Society’s Meet The Media event at the start of the Festival, and tell us about your show. Fourthly, try tweeting at me. It’s worked for other people. Finally: whether we review your show or not comes down to a lot of factors, but they are honestly mostly logistical. A show might make it on to my short-list, but if I don’t have a reviewer available at the right time of day to see it, then there’s not a great deal I can do. So, do all of the above, and then pray to the schedule-gods!”
Caro Moses – Editor at ThreeWeeks


 

WHAT TO DO WITH POSITIVE COVERAGE

“Whack it on every flyer, every poster and share it online lots. If it’s a particularly amazing review it’s also with considering spending the price of a couple of tickets on some sponsored social posts. This can be tricky to decide when to do, as it all adds to the cashflow nightmare that is the Edinburgh Fringe, but it can really help sales”.
Madelaine Bennett – publicist at Premier

“The most effective thing is printing off mini-flashes with select quotes and star ratings and attaching them to your flyers. I know that’s the really simple answer, but that’s because it really works!”
Jen McGowan – Press Officer at theSpaceUK


 

WHAT TO DO WITH NEGATIVE COVERAGE

“Don’t let them get you down! Your morale is important and you need to look after yourself. Reviews are not the be all and end all. If you get a bad review, just ignore it and carry on”.
Jen McGowan – Press Officer at theSpaceUK

“You really do have to take it on the chin, sadly. Unless something is published that is blatantly untrue and therefore potentially libelous. In which case, call your PR if you have one, or speak to the EdFringe media office if you don’t, as those kinds of write ups – which are thankfully relatively rare – can usually be taken down. Write ups where the journalist just didn’t like your show are sadly not something your PR has any power to take down, and really, nor should they be able to, or the entire system would become pointless. I have had the odd client demanding that I have a review taken down simply because it wasn’t positive, but it’s hugely unlikely to be possible”.
Madelaine Bennett – publicist at Premier


 

GETTING THE INDUSTRY INTO YOUR SHOW

“With so many things to see, it is often hard to get the right industry people into your show early on: it is often better to wait until you have some good reviews behind you, which will reassure people that their time will not be wasted if they do come to your show. Of course, you should also be realistic about where to pitch your show: is someone booking a 1000-seat theatre really going to be interested in a show playing a studio in Edinburgh?”
producer James Seabright


 

THINK AHEAD ABOUT NEXT YEAR’S FESTIVAL

“We receive a lot of written applications, but it is very hard to judge a show without seeing it live, so most of our programming tends to be based on shows and performers we’ve been able to see the previous Fringe. So, I would recommend that companies think about where they want to be performing next year and if it’s a venue with a curated programme like ours, then maybe get in touch during this Festival and ask them to come and see your show”.
Katrina Woolley – Head Of Programming at the Bedlam Theatre


 

MAKE USE OF FRINGE CENTRAL

“The Fringe Society also hold some incredibly useful talks and events as well as releasing tonnes of tips for selling your show – so get reading!”
the team at Paradise Green

“Attend everything you possibly can from the Fringe Central programme of events – it is a fabulous resource”.
Darren Neale and Tara Stapleton – Venue Directors at Greenside

“The Fringe Office run a brilliant arts industry service which is there to help artists and industry to liaise with each other: think of it like a high-end dating service for shows. It’s really worth going to have a chat with them so your show is on their radar and they can give some advice on who you might want to invite”.
producer James Seabright


 

PERFORMING ON THE ROYAL MILE

“You start on the Fringe’s own website where you will find all the instructions and the link to a website called Eventotron, where you can sign up for slots at both the Edinburgh Fringe and several other festivals as well. The programme is divided into a few categories, mainly because different types of performance have different requirements. Living statues, balloons, caricaturists and portrait artists get longer time slots and are placed in areas that are appropriate for their needs. Buskers and circle shows do 30 or 45 minute performances and pass the hat at the end. Musicians have their own programme which accommodates for time, place and volume”.
magician Paul Nathan


 

BUILDING AN AUDIENCE FOR STREET SHOWS

“The great grandfather of San Francisco street theatre, Ray Jason, once told me, “pretend you are standing in front of the fire place in your living room about to tell a joke to a room full of friends – everyone wants it to be a good story, everyone wants you to succeed”. It’s the best advice for performing I have ever received and particularly so for gathering a crowd. Be confident and they will come. Be comfortable! It’s your space, it’s your time, it’s your show. Don’t be afraid to start small and build. You have time. Write material for the build. The first five or ten minutes of your show can be interaction with the audience that teaches them how to be an audience, puts them where you want them, and creates a space, a stage, a scene that is yours and theirs. Finally – include them in the process and let them be a part of the show from the beginning. I don’t just mean as volunteers, I mean as participants in the process of creating a show”.
magician Paul Nathan


 

ASKING FOR MONEY AT THE END OF A FREE SHOW

“Some people murmur something inaudible, gesturing awkwardly towards a bucket, and some people have a big speech prepared. I might do it as a song this year. It’s not something you look forward to at first, but those reservations disappear pretty quickly. It’s actually incredibly honest and straightforward: they’re paying you directly for an hour’s entertainment. That kind of direct transaction is pretty rare these days. There’s no middle man and they know that their money won’t go to propping up Third World dictators (unless that is how you choose to spend it)”.
comedian Nick Doody


 

IF YOU DIRECT OR DESIGN AN EDINBURGH SHOW – DO YOU NEED TO BE AT THE FESTIVAL ITSELF?

“I accompanied the team to Edinburgh so I could be there while they were setting up the show. I also like to actually be there for the performances and to operate the show as many times as possible. This is partly because, with time, the show changes and develops, and I might want to adjust the lighting design to adapt to those changes. Plus you might also have new ideas once the show is up and running. So it is important to be there again and again”.
lighting designer Attila Lenzsér

“I think it’s very important to be present at the Fringe. It’s such a great environment to meet other artists and producers. I think that the atmosphere of the Fringe is unique and I love the vibe at Summerhall. You never know what new collaborators you might meet and connect with, so there are always two strands at work, the play you are running and the cementing of relationships with your colleagues from all over the world”.
Emma Jordan – Artistic Director at Prime Cut


 

SETTING UP A VENUE

“Be genuine with your intentions and clear about what you offer. Understand what it costs a company to bring a show to the Fringe and invest in giving them a strong and positive platform”.
Charles Pamment – Venue Director at theSpaceUK

“Be prepared for it not being an overnight success and be prepared to lose money. Do your homework on the risks and the costs. Think about the location, what your programme will be and who your potential audience is. Are you in the best place for where all will align and, most importantly, how are you going to make yourself stand out? And only do it because you want to have fun. That’s the most likely result”.
Ed Bartlam and Charlie Wood – Directors at Underbelly

“Think carefully about why you want to do it. If your reasoning is sound and you’ve done your research, then absolutely go for it. The wonder of Edinburgh is its variety, and new venues coming onto the scene adds to the unique and vibrant environment that makes the Edinburgh Festival so special”.
Darren Neale and Tara Stapleton – Venue Directors at Greenside

“Running a venue is hard work, but incredibly satisfying. Seeing the doors open for your first show makes it all worthwhile and being part of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe is like nothing else. Despite the long hours, stressful days and tough decisions there are a community of venue managers who will always support you and are happy to share their experiences and war stories – especially if you buy us a beer or two!”
the team at Paradise Green

“The venue market at the Edinburgh Fringe is incredibly competitive and it’s easy to get it wrong. If you’ve got an idea though – a beautiful, nagging, won’t-leave-you-alone idea of how to make something special and new – then you should go for it. Figure out how to achieve your ambition and overcome all the inevitable hurdles, because the Fringe always benefits from new ideas and new approaches”.
JD Henshaw – Venue Director at Sweet Venues

“Get a big overdraft facility and play nicely with the neighbours!”
Anthony Alderson – Director at Pleasance


 

AND NOW SOME FINAL TOP TIPS TO GET THE MOST OUT OF YOUR EDINBURGH FESTIVAL EXPERIENCE…

“Work with people you trust. Maximise the opportunity by making sure the right programmers and producers get in to see the work. Be prepared to lose money. Get a good marketing plan in place before you rock up. And know it’s a jungle … go for it with a heart and a hand”.
Emma Jordan – Artistic Director at Prime Cut

“Keep other shows success stories in perspective when it seems that all around you people maybe doing better. I always have to remember that all the stories around other shows are the ones that the producers, PRs or venues want you to hear!”
producer Kate Taylor

“Another challenge is the walking, always the walking! This year I brought a bike and I’ve managed to do so much more!”
Russell Dean – Artistic Director at Strangeface Theatre

“Bring a raincoat! See lots of work from people you don’t know. Be prepared to fly by the seat of your pants and always remember, nobody died”.
Emma Jordan – Artistic Director at Prime Cut

“Good luck! Most venues, PRs, performers and audiences are pain in the arse!!!”
comedy promoter Brett Vincent

“Remember to eat, drink and sleep! But most of all, enjoy it!”
Alison Pollard-Mansergh – Artistic Director at ITI